Category Archives: Gardening

Tips for Great Girls’ Weekends

Do you feel disconnected from your best and oldest buddies? Are you stressed, overworked and in desperate need of a mini-break? A relaxing girls’ weekend in the country might be just the tonic you need to rejuvenate your relationships, decompress and add a bit of balance to your life. The options for girls’ weekends are truly only limited by your imagination. Follow these suggestions from the professional travel gurus and you’ll soon be packing your bags for a glorious weekend away.

While you certainly don’t need to have a massive budget to enjoy a weekend away, you certainly need to set a budget before beginning the planning process. Take in consideration the costs for transportation, lodging, meals and any additional entertainment expenses. These can range from tickets to the movies or charges for massages. Once your budget has been set, determine the maximum number of hours you’re comfortable traveling for a weekend away. Make arrangements to take off work if the departure or return runs into your normally scheduled business day. It’s strongly recommended to keep travel time below three hours if the plan is to spend two nights away. Otherwise, you’ll be spending a substantial amountof your precious free time on the road or in the air. Account for travel and waiting times to and from the airport. Check out the fabulous deals offered by Groupon coupon for the many different Motel 6  properties perfect for girls’ weekends.

Once a destination has been determined and accommodations are booked, the anticipation begins. Research the different restaurants in the area and book reservations well in advance to ensure the availability of your first choice. Check online to explore the public parks and hiking trails that are available. The local Visitor’s Bureau will have an assortment of information on local attractions. Be sure to have an alternative plan be for outdoor activities should the weather not cooperate.

Finally, commit to spending the better part of the weekend disconnected from your devices. Reconnect with your friends and enjoy the luxury of simply relaxing and decompressing for the weekend. Chances are you’ll all have such a grand time that you’ll make it an annual tradition. Best of luck to you!

Japanese Gardening

  • Main principles on the garden’s design

Bring the Japanese feeling into your garden with these basic steps. First of all, embrace the ideal of nature. That means, keep things in your garden as natural as possible, avoiding to include things that could disrupt this natural appearance. For example, don’t include square ponds in your design as square ponds are nowhere to be found in nature. Also, a waterfall would be something closer to what exists in nature if we compare it to a fountain. So you also have to consider the Japanese concept of sumi or balance. Because one of Japanese gardening design main purposes is to recreate large landscapes even in the smallest place. Be careful when choosing the elements for your garden, because you don’t want to end up filling your ten by ten courtyard with huge rocks. As a miniaturized landscape, the rocks in the garden would represent mountains and the ponds would represent lakes. A space filled with sand would represent an ocean. By that we assume that garden masters were looking to achieve a minimalistic approach, best represented by the phrase “less is more”.

  • The elements of time and space

One of the things westerners notice at first are the many portions of empty space in the garden. In fact, these spaces are an important feature in Japanese gardening. This space called ma, relates to the elements around it and that also surround it. The concepts of in and yo are of vital importance here, they are best known to the Western civilization by the Chinese names yin and yang. If you want to have something you have to start with having nothing. This is an idea quite difficult to understand, but it is a rule of thumb in Japanese gardening. An important clue in the development of a garden is the concept of wabi and sabi. There’s no literal English translation for those words. Wabi is about uniqueness, or the essence of something; a close literal translation is solitary. Sabi deals with the definition of time or the ideal image of something; the closest definition might be time strengthened character. Given the case, a cement lantern that might appear unique, would lack of that ideal image. Or an old rock covered in lichens would have no wabi if it’s just a round boulder. That’s why it is important to find that balance.

Flowering Cherries

While the briefness of their glory has to be acknowledged, cherries really are the hardy spring-flowering trees for temperate climate gardens. I can think of no others, apart from their close Prunus relatives and some of the magnolias that even come close to rivalling flowering cherries for sheer weight of bloom and vibrance of colour. The genus Prunus is widely recognised as being divided into 5 or 6 subgenera, though some botanists prefer to recognise these as distinct genera. The subgenus cerasus is the one to which the cherries belong. This group includes a wide variety of species, many of which are not highly ornamental. The species which are of most interest to gardeners are the Chinese and Japanese cherries, not only because they tend to be the most attractive, but also because they tend to be reasonably compact, often have attractive autumn foliage as well as spring flowers and because centuries of development in oriental gardens have produced countless beautiful cultivars.

The Japanese recognise two main groups of flowering cherries: the mountain cherries or yamazakura and the temple or garden cherries, the satozakura. The mountain cherries, which tend to have simple flowers, are largely derived from the original Mountain Cherry (Prunus serrulata var. spontanea), Prunus subhirtella and Prunus incisa. They are mainly cultivated for their early-blooming habit, which is just as well because their rather delicate display would be overwhelmed by the flamboyance of the garden cherries.

The garden cherries are the result of much hybridisation, mostly unrecorded, so we can’t be exactly sure of their origins. Prunus serrulata (in its lowland form) and Prunus subhirtella also feature largely in their background. The other major influences are Prunus sargentii, Prunus speciosa, Prunus apetala and possibly the widespread Bird Cherries (Prunus avium and Prunus padus). The result of these old hybrids and modern developments is the wealth of forms that burst into bloom in our gardens every spring.

Regretfully, that complex parentage and those centuries of development and countless cultivars combined with Western misunderstandings of Japanese names and multiple introductions of the same plants under different names has led to considerable confusion with the names of flowering cherries.

Most of the popular garden plants are lumped together under three general headings:

1. Prunus subhirtella cultivars and hybrids;

2. Sato-zakura hybrids;

But however you view them, flowering cherries have so much to offer that a little confusion over naming and identification shouldn’t stand in the way of your including them in your garden. And now that many of them are available as container-grown plants that can be bought in flower, it’s really just a matter of choosing the flowers you like. Nevertheless, it’s nice to know exactly which plant you’re dealing with, so that you can be sure of its performance and size. While most of the larger nurseries and garden centres take care to supply plants that are true to type, make sure on first flowering that your cherries match their label descriptions. Misidentification, or perhaps misrepresentation, is common.

Prunus subhirtella cultivars and hybrids

Although the flowers of Prunus subhirtella are usually small and fairly simple, they appear from early winter well into spring, depending on the cultivar. Not only that, the cultivars themselves are long-flowering, often being in bloom for three weeks to a month. There are many cultivars, but most are similar to, or forms of the two main types listed below.

  • Autumnalis

This is the most reliable winter-flowering form. It often starts to bloom in late April to early May and can carry flowers right through until mid September. It seldom produces a massive burst of bloom, rather sporadic clusters of flowers. This is just as well because the flowers are damaged by heavy frosts. The flowers of Autumnalis are white to pale pink opening from pink buds; those of ‘Autumnalis Rosea’ are the same but with a deep pink centre.

  • Pendula

Prunus autumnalis tends to have weeping branches and ‘Pendula’ is a cultivar that emphasises this feature. Its flowers are usually pale pink and open in late winter to early spring. ‘Falling Snow’ is a cultivar with pure white flowers, while those of ‘Rosea’ are deep pink.

Sato-zakura hybrids

  • Fugenzo

Fugenzo was one of the first, if not the first, Japanese cherry to be grown in European gardens. It ‘s origins can be traced back to at least the 15th century. Its flowers are white to very pale pink, opening from pink buds, and when fully open how two conspicuous green leaf-like pistils in the centre of the flower.

  • Taihaku

Taihaku , also known as the great white cherry, has white flowers up to 5cm across. It grows to at least 8m tall with a wider spread and its flowers open at the same time as its bronze foliage expands, making a pleasant contrast. Thought to have been lost to cultivation, this cultivar was identified in Sussex garden from an old Japanese print.

Gorgeous Wedding Flowers Tips

1. Choose Flowers in Season

This is a critical money-saver. It is also important to keep in mind that flowers look and smell best when they are fresh and in season. This is especially true for roses. But if you have your heart set on a particular flower that holds sentimental value for you, it would be wise to plan your ceremony around the time period it will be in seasonal bloom.  Although flowers in season will give you a beautifully scented bouquet, use caution with the flowers you choose to include in any centerpieces at your reception. The fragrances that come from flowers as gardenia, jasmine or freesia can be overwhelming and may not be the best choice for dining tables. Overpowering flowers might also stir up any allergies that your guests may have.

2. Do it yourself

Keep in mind, however, that even if opting for the “budget bridal bouquet”, remember that it is a very key aspect of the wedding and should be an expression of the bride’s personality. Try to keep a sense of balance between the wedding gown, the bridesmaid’s gowns, the ceremony flowers and decorations and the bouquet. If you are getting married in the spring/summer time, visit the farmer’s market and talk with the flowers vendors. Find out if they grow the flowers that you are looking for and don’t be shy to ask if they have ever done weddings. Always be sure to ask them what they do with the flowers that they don’t sell. You might be able to grab large amounts of them for a steal!

Tip: Try using masses of one flower to showcase the flower’s individual beauty.

3. Use a school

Most high schools and colleges have horticulture classes that specialize in caring for and arranging flowers and plants. For a small fee, you could hire these aspiring florists who would be thrilled to work on your arrangements. The teachers of such a course will act as your safety net and, as an added bonus to you, will have extensive experience and oversee your project.

4. Have a Garden Wedding

Consider having the ceremony and/or the reception in a beautiful garden! Do you know someone that has a beautiful backyard and would be honored to host a wedding there? There will be no need for arrangements if you are already surrounded by lush greenery and blossoming flowers. Be prepared, though! Depending on the regional climate (or the time of year you hold your wedding), you may want to make use of either awnings, patios or sophisticated white open-air tents in case Mother Nature decides to become a wedding guest!

5. Cut down on attendants

By choosing fewer attendants, you will not have to provide as many bouquets and boutonnieres. Since small ceremonies are currently in vogue, it will be a natural progression to balance out the ceremony with a more intimate wedding party. Many couples favor a secluded setting with soft, glowing candles or lights to provide a devastatingly romantic theme. These more intimate, family oriented gatherings are also advantageous because they help the bride and groom to stay within their budget. It is also very elegant to have your bridesmaid carry a single flower tied with a piece of satin ribbon. Choose a flower that matches one of those in the bride’s bouquet, or that signifies a special meaning to you.


Care for Fresh Flowers

Flowers are beautiful and professionally designed bouquets are especially attractive. Flowers can also carry huge sentimental meaning because they are often given as gifts from people close to us. So it’s little wonder that we would want to extend the life of our flowers and enjoy their aesthetic and sentimental beauty for as long as possible. With proper care and attention most flowers will last around 7 days with some varieties lasting for as long as 14 days. Here are some practical steps to help extend the life of your cut flowers.

Get flowers into water

After only a short time out of water flowers will begin to dehydrate. Therefore it is essential to get flowers into a vase or container of water as quickly as possible. When you first get the flowers home use warm water, not cold or hot, as this is the quickest way to rehydrate the flowers. Warm water will also promote opening of the blooms as most flowers are shipped with the blooms in a closed or tight stage. Technically speaking the optimum temperature is 37.5C (99.5F), which is roughly body temperature. At this temperature air bubbles, which may have formed in the stem, tend to breakup. Also water that is warmer than the surrounding air is more readily taken up by the flowers.

Change the water regularly

Try to change the water every two days. The flowers should be well hydrated by now so you can use cold water instead of warm. This helps keep the flowers cool which is a key part of keeping flowers in good condition.

Use flower preservatives

Each consignment of Affinity Flowers comes with a sachet of flower preservative. Flower preservative contains two main components, carbohydrates and anti-bacterial additives. The carbohydrates act as food which helps to sustain the flowers. The carbohydrates will also stimulate flower heads to open quicker. This is handy when you’re trying to open flowers that usually ship with tight blooms like lilies. The bactericide component inhibits bacteria developing in the water. Bacteria laden water will cause flowers to deteriorate quicker. Bacteria is also a problem because it can block flower stems and hinder the uptake of water. If left long enough the bacteria will also discolour the vase water and produce an unpleasant odour. Simply empty the contents of the flower preservative sachet into the vase water. If you don’t have flower preservative you could add 1-2 drops of bleach to the water instead. The bleach will act as an anti-bacterial just like the additives in commercial flower preservatives.

Remove leaves that will be under water

This is important as leaves that are below the waterline will deteriorate quickly and become a breeding ground for bacteria. If you have a professionally arranged bouquet you’ll find that the leaves have already been removed by the florist. But flowers bought loose or unarranged might still have leaves low on the stem.

Keep flowers cool

Flowers should be kept in cool conditions. Keep them away from direct sunlight, heaters, lamps and other heat sources. Also try not to leave flowers in a hot vehicle when transporting them. This is why specialist flower delivery couriers have chilled storage on-board their vehicles. Each variety has its own optimal holding temperature but the ideal temperature for most flowers is a chilly 4-5C (39-41F), about the temperature inside your refrigerator. Obviously these aren’t ideal temperatures for people but if you really wanted to extend the life of your flowers you could place them in the refrigerator overnight or if you were going to be away for an extended period.

Summer Wedding Flower

Summer is a time of fun. A sunny day simply has an uplifting effect on even the most pessimistic of people. Smiling and laughter seem intuitive, and most people simply enjoy the outdoors. It is probably predictable that most wedding occur in summer, after all it is that time of year when most people are physically warm and comfortable. Sure there are exceptions, but generally clear, warm weather tends to translate into clear, warm temperament. It is not surprisingly that summer brides are spoilt for choice when it comes to summer wedding flowers, not to mention the proliferation of outdoor wedding venues in summer, which also gives the bride additional options. In addition it also enables her to align her wedding flowers to the venue, using tropical flowers in exotic venues, wild flowers in garden venues and even beach flowers at beach venues.

In terms of summer wedding flowers the most popular flowers would definitely include (although not be limited) to the following:

1. Sunflowers

A firm favorite at many a summer wedding. This is a physically large flower that makes an immediate statement. The name sunflower says it all. Unquestionably the best flower ambassador for the bright summer sun, these fiery blooms with a dark or black center are particularly popular in yellow, and interestingly are also available in red, brown, orange, bronze and mahogany. This summer wedding flower acts as a distinct focal point in all arrangements. Generally a summer bride will construct her arrangement around a select few sunflowers.

2. Gazanias

Usually referred to as the Treasure Flower, this is a potentially contentious choice as a summer wedding flower. When using these flowers a bride should plan around a daytime wedding and cut the flowers as late as possible, especially given their tendency to close at night and in overcast weather. Generally these flowers are available in a vast array of dynamic colors, including multi-hued colors which amplifies the effect of the gazanias.

3. Dahlia

If an unconventional and somewhat unstructured floral appeals to you then dahlias would be a serious consideration on your big day. Definitely a somewhat right-brained flower, dahlias work exceptionally well in summer weddings. Big, shaggy and multi-petaled describes this flower well, with a sea anemone resembling its closet relative in a parallel universe. Definitely diverse in appearance, most species have a distinct quant and frothy look to them, in one form or another. Definitely an interesting taking point with your guests.

4. Black Eyed Susan

Just the term black-eyed susan conjures up some interesting images with brides. Of course in reference to a wedding flower, as opposed to a femme fatale. Generally considered to be a wild flower found in open woods and road sides, they make excellent summer wedding flowers and are particularly popular with the more vintage and rustic-type weddings. Similar to daffodils they are particularly well-known for their striking yellow colors and dark centers, and are great friends with bees and butterflies. These daisy-like flowers are also available in orange, brown, red and sometimes in a multi-hued appearance.

5. Poppy

Poppies sometimes just simply get bad rap, in particular with their associations with the narcotics trade. The truth is these flowers make for delightful wedding flowers and remain ever popular with summer weddings. These somewhat tubular-looking blooms grow on a long and thin flexible stem and are available in a variety of colors. Red and white poppies in particular make for a stunning combination in a wedding bouquet.

Wooden Garden Office

A lot of people have an old cabin that they can use as the place of work. In the high uptake in the home working, wooden garden offices have become more popular. Nowadays people try to live greener and healthier so wooden garden offices are coming back to our lives. People are interested in sustainable development and ecology and this is increasing each year. They build wooden garden offices because they want to work in a healthy places in their gardens. What is great when working from your home is your space that isn’t cluttered up with your kid’s toys or other unused gardening tools. Wooden garden offices have a lot of advantages such as curb appeal, fire resistance, noise reduction, and energy-efficiency. Now you can enjoy working in a top-quality and environmental friendly place.

If you want to have a place to work, you can add an extension of your house. The thing is that it is costly and you’ll need the planning permission. Alternatively, you can buy a wooden garden office. Of course, you can think of it as just being a plain summer-house in your garden but today they can be built fully equipped for home working. We could say that wooden garden office will be far better built than just a simple summer-house and will feel far more durable as a whole. Older wooden garden offices may only be equipped with the basic conveniences only but the new ones may have the option of double glazing and insulated walls, as well as being capable of having electrical sockets and lighting fitted.

What is more, when you finish your work of the day, you only have a few minutes to walk home. Not only that, but the most of these small buildings don’t need planning permission so it means that you can have it built in a few weeks. You will save months when compared to building an extension. There are many building companies offering only a few styles of the wooden garden offices, while the other offer many. The one who deals with a lot of styles would have a greater choice to look through and the main question is which building company offers the most different designs. If you really want to have a great and sturdy one, it is extremely important to choose the right manufacturer. Remember that a lot of building companies can offer you a great and beautiful wooden garden offices directly from the factory at the manufacturer’s price.

Wood is a sturdy building material without negative effects on the human’s body. What is more, natural spruce and pine color creates favorable conditions for full relaxation and calms the nervous systems. Now it is clear that wooden garden office is a great choice if you want to have a calm place to work and do not have any negative effect on your body. The most used types of the wood is cypress, cedar, and pine, but there are many other options as well. Nowadays internet offers a lot of information, ranging species of logs to styles of logs, from planning to information on thousands of manufacturers and designers. These wooden garden offices have a lot of benefits as they are sturdy, durable, warm, healthy, easy to build, cozy, and without any negative impact on human’s body. We recommend to own it for those who want to work in a beautiful, long-lasting, high-quality, and sturdy wooden garden office.

Tips To Improve Your Garden Decor

Gardens are not just places where one grows plants and vegetables. To complement the amount of effort you put in here, you should try and improve your garden decor so that your garden looks beautiful, even without flowers. Here are some tips to help you work on it:

1) Singular focus

One way to make a difference to your garden decor is to focus on one part of the garden and build the rest around it. This can be done by building a gazebo, an arbor, a rose pillar or any statues or sculptures of interest.

2) A sense of architecture

You can provide an architectural form and a sense of style to your garden decor by adding a bit of iron gate work, elegant metal topiary forms or concrete statuary to the garden. Simple garden ornaments and artful decor contribute tremendously to the aesthetic value to your outdoor living garden spaces.

3) Adding water features – a waterfall or a fountain

Building a waterfall or a fountain can add a lot of value to your garden decor. In fact, most Japanese gardens have a water feature, and the ones without water features have something that represents water, like grey gravel or sand. If you would like to be a little innovative, you can turn your whole garden into a water garden.

4) Collect and scatter

After having collected a variety of art and ornamentation to add to your garden decor, make sure you scatter it throughout the landscape. Some people place topiary, sculpture or tuteur forms in distant small landscaped garden spaces for maximum viewing impact. Try and frame ornamental pieces of art with easy-growing shrubs and low-growing flowers.

5) Correct use of planters and containers

For an elegant garden decor, you may need to carefully choose the planters and containers to hold your plants. Many kinds of containers are available, the popular ones being made of concrete, fibre stone, fibreglass and plastic. For earth tones, you might choose terracotta. Correct use of planters can also add height, shape and life to your garden.

6) Lighting

Lighting up a garden nicely also enhances the garden decor. Other than lighting up the pathway in your garden, you can also light up a specific tree by focusing light beams on it. Make sure you keep safety concerns in mind for lighting options.

7) Define your place – use varieties of height

Garden ornamentation will define garden spaces. Taller garden decor and sculpture can create pleasant and sprawling visual architecture in small spaces. Always try and place taller plantings toward the back of the garden. Try and use varieties of height to beautify your garden.

Finally, no matter how you wish to decorate your garden, you should make sure that everything is harmonized. Utilizing all your resources with perfect balance can enhance your garden decor and make it your own piece of paradise.

Japanese Gardening

Japanese gardens are becoming popular and more gardens in the States are trying to have one part of them turned into a Japanese garden. In this Japanese gardening article, you are going to learn 3 types of Japanese garden styles which is very important for the planning of such gardens. You should know about the meaning of each types of garden because you would not want to spoil the theme of your whole garden. Let me get down and dirty to explain three of them to you. When people talk about Japanese garden styles, people will start imagining about small gardens without much flowers. Yes, this is the most popular style but the truth is, true Japanese gardens take up a lot of space. The small one that we always hear of will be the courtyard garden.

Courtyard gardens have only a few features but to be simple is the key here. The purpose of having little features is to promote serenity and peace when you walk into the area. It does not aim to cause confusion and thus, a small water feature. a miniature tree and a few plants will be enough for a courtyard garden. Japanese gardening also includes a style of garden called tea garden. Again, flowers should be nowhere to be seen in this garden style. It usually consists of an outer and an inner garden. The inner garden will be the place where you find a small hut designated for tea ceremonies. You do need to keep in mind that the term “tea garden” does not mean that you need to have tea plants planted in the garden. It is only named that way because the garden is used for tea ceremonies.

Another style of Japanese garden that is popular in Japan itself is the pond and island garden. Yes, it does require a lot of place to create such a breathtaking masterpiece. You may not have the space for it but you can always incorporate the style into your garden. If you can accommodate a pond in your garden, try planting some water lilies and rear some Japanese Koi fish the pond. For the plants, you can have some perennials and some decorating features just to turn your visitors’ attention to the pond. It is always nice to plant a big tree beside a pond because I am sure living creatures in there require a shade. The flows of water and the chirping of birds from the pond and island garden will definitely mix into your own relaxation tune.

Organic Gardening Tips

1. Test your soil:

If you are looking to have a successful outcome with an organic vegetable garden, you should first test your soil with a do-it-yourself home testing kit before you plant anything. These testing kits can be found at local garden centers and on the Internet at garden speciality stores. The kits use a number scale, 0 to 14, that helps you determine the acidity or alkalinity (also known as pH) levels of your soil. For most vegetables, an ideal number is about 6.5. If the results are too acidic (towards the low end of the scale) or too alkaline (towards the high end of the scale), your plants will not be able reap the benefits of the soil’s nutrients. Once you know the results of your soil, you will be able to adjust the soil accordingly by balancing these levels with the nutrients it is lacking.

2. Make plans ahead of time and decide where and how you will grow your garden:

If you have high quality soil in your yard and you have determined a location, you will want to take advantage of the benefits found in it. Healthy soils have upwards of 650 million microorganisms per one gram of soil. These organisms already present, such as earthworms and other forms of soil life are essential to the life of the soil and will help your garden prosper by providing your plants with valuable nutrients and minerals.

What to do if your soil is not healthy or if you do not have space for a garden at home:

    • Build a raised bed
    • By making a raised bed, you will have control over the garden’s soil quality. When building your bed, use untreated wood, stones, or brick as a side border and be sure to make the border at least 16 inches high as the depth is important. The plants’ roots will need room to stretch and grow.

    • Consider container gardening
    • If you are a city dweller, you do not have to miss out on the benefits of growing your own produce. Plant in containers that are large enough to accommodate root growth. Be sure they also have drainage holes. If you are planting organic herbs, pots that are at least 6 inches across are ideal. Another helpful hint is to use plastic pots instead of terra cotta pots. Plastic may not be as aesthetically pleasing, but they will hold moisture longer and will not dry out as quickly as terra cotta pots.

3. Select authentic, high quality organic vegetable seeds to use in your garden:

Organic seeds can be found at local nurseries, garden stores, home centers, online seed stores, seed catalogs, and farm supply stores. Always make sure the seed company is “certified organic” and be sure to stay away from any seeds that are “genetically engineered.” To save money, start growing the seeds indoors and transplant outdoors when ready.

4. Make your own compost:

Compost, also known as gardeners gold, is a vital element in organic gardening that improves the soil structure of your garden. Compost provides a great source of nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, and micro/macronutrients essential for plant growth. It also aids in stabilizing soil moisture and pH which helps keep the soil cooler during the summer months.

Other benefits of organic compost:

  • Great source of food for wildlife because it attracts insects and fungi that eat decaying matter. These small animals support larger animals like songbirds
  • Suppresses plant disease
  • Assists in controlling soil erosion

How to compost:

  • Build or buy a compost bin. These can be found at home centers, garden centers, and online.
  • Place compost material in repeated layers. To give your compost the best result, alternate layers of green matter with brown matter. An example would be alternating kitchen scraps with straw/stalks or dead leaves with grass clippings.

Some ideas for good compostables:

  • Aquarium water, plants, and algae
  • Tea leaves/coffee grounds
  • Pet rabbit or hamster droppings

5. Use water wisely:

Water conservation, harvesting, and recycling are great methods for organic gardening.

  • Recycle/harvest rain water
  • Not only is rainwater is a great way to hydrate your plants, but it is also an excellent way to lower your monthly water bills, reduce storm-water runoff, and prevent flooding and erosion. It is generally clean, free of containments and byproducts such as minerals, fluoride and chlorine and has a low pH which plants and soils like. Rainwater can be collected and stored using gutters, downspouts, rain barrels and/or cisterns and can be used whenever needed, even later in the season during dry weather

Watering tips:

  • Water your garden when the air and soil are cool, typically in the early morning or evening hours. During these times, less water will be lost due to evaporation.
  • Water deeply but less often. Direct the water at the root systems at the base of the plant. This will encourage plants to grow deeper roots, causing them to need less watering. Shallow watering causes the roots to grow close to the surface, making them more vulnerable to drought.